Photography Workshops
Call Me 479-414-6889

Hoh Rain Forest – Olympic National Park

 

The Hoh Rain Forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101 Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest.

The Hoh Rain Forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101
Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest.

Hoh Rain Forest

 

The Hoh Rain Forest is located in the stretch of the Pacific Northwest rainforest which once spanned the Pacific Remove Tagcoast from southeastern Alaska to the central coast of California. The Hoh is one of the finest remaining examples of temperate rainforest in the United States and is one of the park’s most popular destinations.

Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest.

The Hoh Rain Forest is a World Heritage Site and a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO, and the ecosystem have not changed in thousands of years making it one of the best preserved rain forests in the northern hemisphere.

The Hoh Rain Forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101 Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest. (Greg Disch gdisch@gregdisch.com)

Admission & Hours

Olympic National Park is open 24 hours a day year-round, although some roads, campgrounds and facilities are open seasonally.

The park entrance fee is $20 for a private, non-commercial vehicle, $10 for individuals entering on a motorcycle, or $7 for individuals entering on foot or bicycle. Entrance fees are good for seven consecutive days. Annual, interagency, military, senior and access passes are also available. Additional fees are charged for camping, wilderness overnight use, and commercial use.

The visitor center is open daily during the summer, closed December through early March, and generally open Friday through Sunday during the spring and fall seasons (hours may vary according to season.)

 

What to Photograph:

The majority of the rainforest is lined with nurse logs, ferns, moss, and other temperate plant species.

Near the visitor center is the Hall of Mosses Trail, a short trail—0.8 miles which gives visitors a feel for the local ecosystem and views of maples draped with large growths of spikemoss.

The Hoh Rain Forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101 Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest. (Greg Disch gdisch@gregdisch.com)

Olympic National Park is home to the largest un-managed herd of Roosevelt elk in the Pacific Northwest.

The Hoh Rain Forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101 Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest. (Greg Disch gdisch@gregdisch.com)

Best Time for Photographers:

Anytime is a good time here, there is enough variety and different angles to be able to shoot all day long.  With the area receiving over 12 feet of rain per year, chances are it will be raining or at least misting.  This is a good thing when photographing the rain forest, as it will provide a soft light and the moss will be very lush and green.

The Hoh Rain Forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101 Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest. (Greg Disch gdisch@gregdisch.com)

Getting There:

Driving Directions

The Hoh lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, about a two-hour drive from Port Angeles and under an hour from Forks. The Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101

 

Maps:

Interactive Google Map

Use the map  + – controls to zoom in and out, click and drag the to move the map, use the Map drop-down to change to “Map”, “Satellite”, “Hybrid”, or “Terrain” views.  Drag the little man icon from the upper left corner to a map location for street level view.

Facilities

Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center

Rest rooms

Open Daily in summer; open Friday-Sunday remainder of year. Hours vary according to season.

Visitor information, exhibits about Olympic’s temperate rain forests. Self-guided nature trails; one accessible with some assistance. Wilderness use permits and animal resistant food containers available.

The Hoh Rain Forest has a campground that is open year round, with 88 sites located in the old growth forest along the river.

The Hoh Rain Forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Rain Forest is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off of Highway 101 Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet!) of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rainforest. (Greg Disch gdisch@gregdisch.com)

Location Contact Information:

Visitor Information
(360) 565-3130
Road & Weather Hotline
(360) 565-3131
Olympic National Park Visitor Center
3002 Mount Angeles Road
Port Angeles, WA 98362

Mailing Address

600 East Park Avenue
Port Angeles, WA 98362

Nearest City or Town:

 Forks

Hoh Rain Forest Photo Gallery

Click Here for full page gallery

More Photographic Destinations in Washington:

Interactive Google Map

Use the map  + – controls to zoom in and out, use the Map drop-down to change to “Map”, “Satellite”, “Hybrid”, or “Terrain” views.  Drag the little man icon from the upper left corner to a map location for street level view. Click on a pushpin for more information about the Photographic Destination, then click on the title to go to the location page.

Click Here for Photographic Destinations by State

 

 

 


Leave a Reply

Subscribe to my Free Newsletter

Keep up to date with new articles, photos, "Photographic Destinations", classes, workshops and more.

Contact Me

Greg Disch
479-414-6889
1918 N. 7th Street
Fort Smith, Arkansas 72904
gdisch@gregdisch.com

Contact Form